Standlee Barn Bulletin

The Standlee Barn Bulletin is your source for insightful articles about premium western forage and beyond.

Grocery Shopping for Thumper

Grocery Shopping for Thumper

Can I feed my rabbit fresh vegetables and fruits from the grocery store? The answer is a qualified YES.

Kudos to you for looking into feeding fresh for your small companion animal. Feeding fresh can deliver some of the essential...

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Equestrian Terminology and Their Origins – Part 1

Equestrian Terminology and Their Origins – Part 1

Do you ever get confused by horse terms and wonder where they came from? If you don't, we're sure your non-horse friends are baffled by some of the words you use when talking about your beloved horse.

Here...

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What Type of Hay Should I Feed My Horse?

What Type of Hay Should I Feed My Horse?

It can be confusing knowing what type of hay to feed horses and other livestock. We pulled together some of the more common questions we hear about feeding hay, from horse and livestock owners. Did we get your question answered?...

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What Do My Goats Need in Their Diet to Be Healthy?

What Do My Goats Need in Their Diet to Be Healthy?

It seemed like a good idea; let’s get some goats for the children to show, which will, in turn, teach them responsibility. Then reality sets in, and you realize you don’t know that much about feeding and keeping a goat...

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Knowledge is Key

Knowledge is Key

Have you heard? Standlee Premium Western Forage’s revitalized packaging has never looked so good! With the same great product quality and consistency you’ve come to expect, we’ve freshened up the look of our packaging and website to ease your forage...

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        "metaDescription": "Looking into feeding fresh for your small companion animal? Feeding fresh can deliver some of the essential nutrients but also provides a necessary life enrichment activity for the animal.",
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Can I feed my rabbit fresh vegetables and fruits from the grocery store? The answer is a qualified YES.

\n

Kudos to you for looking into feeding fresh for your small companion animal. Feeding fresh can deliver some of the essential nutrients but also provides a necessary life enrichment activity for the animal.

\n

So… what does a qualified YES mean? Well, there is a number of vegetables and fruits you can feed but moderation is necessary. We will get into the moderation explanation shortly and provide a reference guide for your next visit to the local grocery store.

\n

First, let’s set-up your rabbit for a healthy digestive system by recommending the optimal diet base. According to the House Rabbit Society, the majority of an adult house rabbit’s diet should consist of high-quality grass hay or forage like Timothy or Orchard Grass. Grasses are rich in vitamin A & D, calcium, protein and other nutrients that bunnies need. Young rabbits (12 weeks or younger) or gestating/lactating does need more calories and protein, so alfalfa is recommended.

\n

If your adult rabbit is lacking key nutrients due to their nutritional needs and/or feeding habits, we encourage you to consider augmenting their diet with an adult rabbit specific fortified food to assure your animal gets all the necessary nutrients. Also, you should keep your rabbit on forage for at least 2 weeks before introducing any new foods, including fresh vegetable and fruit options.

\n

Now onto the ‘fresh’ question at hand…

\n

Fresh Food Rules of Thumb…

\n\"Spinach\n

Leafy greens can occupy up to 75% of your rabbit’s allotment of fresh vegetables and fruits. This equates to 1 cup for every 2 lbs. of your rabbit’s weight per day. The only caveat is to mix-up your leafy greens of choice per day to avoid a potentially harmful oxalic acid build-up, which can cause digestive upset.

\n\"Carrots\n

Root vegetables and flowers can also be fed but at a much lower amount. e.g., 1 tbsp per 2 lbs. of body weight per day.

\n

Fruits are high in sugar/starch and can be fed at 1 tsp per 2 lbs. of body weight per day. Fresh is recommended over dried fruits, as dried fruit can have three times the concentration of starches. Fruits can also be used for training and bonding with your rabbit.

\n

Fresh Vegetables and Fruits Reference Sheet for Rabbits

\n

Download our Fresh Vegetables and Fruits Reference Sheet

\n

Leafy Greens I

\n

(1 cup per 2 lbs. of body weight per day; Rotate due to oxalic acid content and only 1 leafy greens/day from this list):

\n\n

Leafy Greens II

\n

(Low in oxalic acid):

\n\n

Root Vegetables and Flowers

\n

(No more than about 15% of the diet; 1 tbsp per 2 lbs. of body weight per day):

\n\n

Fruits

\n

(No more than 10% of the diet; 1 tsp per 2 lbs. of body weight per day):

\n

NOTE: Unless otherwise stated, it is more nutritious to leave the skin on the fruit, just wash thoroughly. If you are in doubt about the source of the fruit and you are concerned about chemicals in the skin, then remove it.

\n\n

Best wishes on your life-enriching feeding adventure with your bunny companion! Bounce back with comments on your experience. We are all ears!

\n

Featured Products

\n\"Standlee\n
\n

Source

\n

House Rabbit Society, Suggested Vegetable and Fruits for a Rabbit Diet by Susan A. Brown, DVM

", "urlWithHost": "http://standleeforage.com/standlee-barn-bulletin/grocery-shopping-for-rabbit-food", "rating": 0.0, "commentsCount": 0, "trackbacksCount": 0 }, { "id": 660717, "type": "BlogsPosts", "date": "2020-07-01T00:00:00", "author": "Jessica Wright", "authorPictureUrl": "/CatalystImages/UserProfileDefault.jpg", "trackbackUrl": "http://standleeforage.com/BlogRetrieve.aspx?BlogID=11741&PostID=660717&A=Trackback", "url": "/standlee-barn-bulletin/equestrian-terminology-and-their-origins-part-1", "title": "Equestrian Terminology and Their Origins – Part 1", "postFeaturedImage": "/images/blog/english_jumper.jpg", "metaTitle": "Equestrian Terminology and Their Origins – Part 1", "metaDescription": "Here is a collection of some of our favorite horse terms and the history we were able to dig up on them.", "body": "

Do you ever get confused by horse terms and wonder where they came from? If you don't, we're sure your non-horse friends are baffled by some of the words\n you use when talking about your beloved horse.

\n

Here is a collection of some of our favorite horse terms and the history we were able to dig up on them.

\n

Crupper: a strap from the back of a saddle passing under the horse's tail. The crupper prevents the saddle from slipping forward. From\n what we found, this term originated around 1250–1300 and came from the Middle English cruper and Anglo-French crupere, which essentially means hindquarters.

\n

Dressage: The International Federation for Equestrian Sports describes dressage as the highest expression of horse training, considered\n the art of equestrian sport, and is used as the groundwork for other disciplines. In this sport, the horse makes movements and maneuvers in response\n to body signals by the rider. The long and colorful traditions of dressage go as far back as Ancient Greece. The name used today, however, is thought\n to be more recent dating from around 1936 based on the French dressage, \"to train, drill.\"

\n

Fetlock: you know that bunch of hair behind the pastern? The fetlock is actually the joint between the cannon bone and the pastern and\n literally translates to \"foot-lock.\" However, the term has early descriptions as a \"tuft of hair behind the pastern-joint of a horse\" in the early\n 14th century. This early emphasis on the \"tuft of hair\" may have been a misinterpretation. The Middle English suffix ok was misread and the word taken\n in folk etymology as a compound of feet and lock, where lock refers to a lock of hair.

\"Hoof\n

Frog: not to be confused with little colorful amphibians that jump, the frog is a part of a horse's hoof, located on the underside, which\n should touch the ground if the horse is standing on soft footing. The frog is a triangular shape and extends mid-way from the heel toward the toe,\n covering around 25% of the bottom of the hoof. It turns out that ‘frog’ is simply the adaptation of Middle English frush (or forg or fursh), in French\n foursche, and in Latin furca. What all these words mean, is “fork.” It makes sense since the prominent feature of the frog on a horse’s hoof is the\n triangular shape that sits in the forked part of the hoof.

\n

Thrush: bet you didn’t think research on the origin of frog would lead to thrush – because we sure didn’t! Interestingly, it seems the\n word “thrush” may also have its roots in the origin of frog. Originally called “running frush”, the hoof disease we now know as thrush was so named\n because it caused the “frush” (fork/frog) to “run” with puss. This later became “running thrush” and finally just “thrush.” The fact that it shares\n the same name as a human fungal infection seems to be coincidence. The term for human thrush shares its origins with the word “throat.” But perhaps\n this explains why people assumed that thrush in horses is also fungal, when it is most commonly a bacterial infection.

\n

Gymkhana: a meet at which riders and horses display a range of skills and aptitudes. Likely originating around 1854, this Anglo-Indian\n term could be a mash-up gend-khana, literally \"ball house,\" and ahanam, \"seat,\" then altered in English by the influence of the word gymnasium.

\n

Johdpurs: pants that are close-fitting, especially around the calves, so they fit inside tall riding boots. English style riders traditionally\n wear jodhpurs. Jodhpurs were initially loose and baggy around the hips and thighs, inspired by the Indian trousers called the churidar, or churidar\n pyjamas. Stretchy modern fabrics have resulted in tighter-fitting jodhpurs, often reinforced inside the knee and thigh. These pants are named after\n the Rajasthani Indian city of Jodhpur.

\n

Lunging: (not to be confused with the exercise so many loathe their trainer for making them do) a type of exercise or training where the\n horse moves around you in a circle on the end of a lunge line. When done correctly, lunging can help a horse learn to be more flexible and balanced,\n as well as increase stamina. It can also be used to check a horse's gait. We struck out on finding the origin of this term. Any ideas?

\n

Barn Sour: refers to a horse that wants to stay at a physical location that represents security. This could be the barn, pasture, or other\n places, which represent the herd's focal point for food, water and social interaction. While we don't know where this term started, we can share that\n this is a type of separation anxiety. It is natural for a horse to be fearful of separation from his \"safe place.\" The horse is both prey and a herd\n species and prefers to remain in areas of comfort and with greater numbers. There is, of course, the occasional anecdote about a horse learning he\n won't have to go to work if he stays in his barn. 😊

\n

Hand: the linear measure of 4 inches (originally 3) is from the1560s. It was originally used for several types of measurements but now\n used only in giving the height of horses.

\n

Did You Know? In the equine world, an animal measuring 14.2 hands at the withers and under is a pony. Any equine measuring more than 14.2 is a horse.\n

\n

Poll: a name of the part of the head, alternatively referencing a point immediately behind or right between the ears. This area of the\n anatomy is of particular significance for the horse. Specifically, the \"poll\" refers to the occipital protrusion at the back of the skull. However,\n in common usage, many refer to the poll joint between the atlas and skull as the poll. The area at the joint has a slight depression and is a sensitive\n location. Thus, because the crownpiece of a bridle passes over the poll joint, a rider can indirectly exert pressure on the horse's poll by means of\n the reins, bit, and bridle. Used in 14th century Middle English polle, meant \"hair of the head; a piece of fur from the head of an animal.\"

\n

Star: a star references the small white marking on a horse's forehead. A faint star may only appear as a few white hairs, or the star\n can be large enough it covers the whole forehead area. Stars can be very symmetrical in shape, like spots or diamonds, or they may appear as irregular\n splotches. No luck on the origin, but look at this little star.

\"Young\n

Tell us about equestrian terms you wonder about in the comments below and we’ll do our best to find the origins in Part 2 of our terminology series.

\n
\n

Sources:\n

\n

https://www.etymonline.com/\n
https://www.vocabulary.com/\n
https://www.thesprucepets.com/horses-4162073\n
https://good-horse.com/blog/horses-frog-a-ribbeting-tale/\n
https://ihearthorses.com/15-horse-terms-that-really-confuse-non-horse-people/\n

", "urlWithHost": "http://standleeforage.com/standlee-barn-bulletin/equestrian-terminology-and-their-origins-part-1", "rating": 0.0, "commentsCount": 0, "trackbacksCount": 0 }, { "id": 660691, "type": "BlogsPosts", "date": "2020-06-24T07:59:37.56", "author": "Jessica Wright", "authorPictureUrl": "/CatalystImages/UserProfileDefault.jpg", "trackbackUrl": "http://standleeforage.com/BlogRetrieve.aspx?BlogID=11741&PostID=660691&A=Trackback", "url": "/standlee-barn-bulletin/what-type-of-hay-should-i-feed-my-horse", "title": "What Type of Hay Should I Feed My Horse?", "postFeaturedImage": "/images/blog/alfalfa_hay.jpg", "metaTitle": "What Type of Hay Should I Feed My Horse?", "metaDescription": "It can be confusing knowing what type of hay to feed horses and other livestock. We pulled together 6 common questions about feeding hay, from horse and livestock owners.", "body": "

It can be confusing knowing what type of hay to feed horses and other livestock. We pulled together some of the more common questions we hear about feeding hay, from horse and livestock owners. Did we get your question answered? Check them out below!

\n

6 Common Questions About Feeding Hay and Different Varieties

\n

1.) What are the differences between types of hay?

\n

There are so many varieties of hay, but let’s do a quick overview of a few common ones fed to horses and other livestock.

\n\n
\n

2.) How many “flakes of hay” should I feed my horse? How do you know how many pounds of pellets to feed compared to flakes of hay?

\n

As easy as it is to just toss in a few flakes of hay to the feeder, we should avoid feeding our horses by “flakes” and instead by weight. Horses should be fed by weight and not by volume at the rate of about 1.5% to 2.5% of their body weight per day in forages. Flakes can vary in size, leaving some bigger and some smaller than others depending on the baling process. Have you heard the riddle about what weighs more, one pound of rocks or one pound of feathers? Instinctively, many of us may jump to say rocks, because rocks are heavier than feathers, right? However, we’re talking weight, not comparing one individual rock to one individual feather. One pound of rocks is the same weight as one pound of feathers. So, if a 1,000 pound horse needs 2% of their body weight in hay, they should be fed 20 pounds of hay a day and we can’t accurately determine what that amount is with flakes.

\n

When weighing feed, it should be measured dry, because when you add water, you are only adding water weight to the product. This doesn’t matter what format you feed because a pound of long-stemmed hay, equals a pound of pelleted hay, equals a pound of cubed hay. Again, weighing the hay, regardless of the format, will help keep your horse’s diet on the right track.

\n

For other animals, check out our nutrition expert’s recommended feeding rates on our website.

\n
\n

3.) What is the most common mistake caretakers make when choosing hay for their horses and ponies?

\n

Buying the cheapest hay they can find. Forage is the most important part of the horse’s diet and can provide your horses with energy, protein vitamin and minerals. Buying high quality forage for your horses is making an investment in their health.

\n
\n

4.) What hay is best to feed a horse with gastric ulcers?

\n

There are an estimated 58% of show horses, 93% of racehorses and 25-50% of foals with gastric ulcer issues. Alfalfa is an ideal forage for horses with or healing from gastric ulcers, due to its calcium content. Feeding a little bit of alfalfa before riding or working, can help buffer the acidity splashing around in the stomach.

\n
\n

5.) What type of hay is best for easy keeper horses?

\n

Easy keeper horses tend to struggle with being overweight or putting on weight easily. Grass forage is a better option for easy keeper horses, such as orchard, timothy or teff grass. Lower in calories, this can fulfill their fiber requirements without too many added calories.

\n
\n

6.) What type of hay is best for hard keeper horses?

\n

Hard keeper horses tend to struggle with being underweight or have a hard time keeping weight on. Alfalfa or mixed forages are ideal forage options for hard keeper horses, e.g. straight alfalfa, alfalfa/timothy grass or alfalfa/oat grass. Although not a hay, but a great fiber source, beet pulp is higher in calories and can also be a helpful addition to hard keeper horse diets.

\n
\n

Still have questions on what type of hay you should feed your horse? One of our Standlee equine nutritionists, Dr. Cubitt, discusses the importance of the following points, in order to identify the forage type most suitable for your horse, in a webinar recording titled, “What Type of Hay Should I Feed My Horse? Pros and Cons of Alfalfa, Timothy, Orchard and Bermuda”:

\n\n

You can also find presentation notes, along with supplemental learning materials shared during the webinar at the recording link above.

\n
\n\t\n
\n

Standlee recommends consulting with your veterinarian or a nutritionist when changing your animal’s feeding program. Please call our Standlee Customer Service team at 1-800-398-0819 or email customerservice@standleeforage.com, with any additional feeding questions.

", "urlWithHost": "http://standleeforage.com/standlee-barn-bulletin/what-type-of-hay-should-i-feed-my-horse", "rating": 0.0, "commentsCount": 0, "trackbacksCount": 0 }, { "id": 660665, "type": "BlogsPosts", "date": "2020-06-16T08:05:54.3", "author": "Jessica Wright", "authorPictureUrl": "/CatalystImages/UserProfileDefault.jpg", "trackbackUrl": "http://standleeforage.com/BlogRetrieve.aspx?BlogID=11741&PostID=660665&A=Trackback", "url": "/standlee-barn-bulletin/what-do-my-goats-need-in-their-diet-to-be-healthy", "title": "What Do My Goats Need in Their Diet to Be Healthy?", "postFeaturedImage": "/images/blog/goat_eating_grass.jpg", "metaTitle": "What Do My Goats Need in Their Diet to Be Healthy?", "metaDescription": "Feeding goats is not that hard if you understand the basics. Goats, like other livestock, require five essential nutrients: water, energy, protein, minerals, and vitamins.", "body": "

It seemed like a good idea; let’s get some goats for the children to show, which will, in turn, teach them responsibility. Then reality sets in, and you realize you don’t know that much about feeding and keeping a goat healthy. The good news is that feeding goats is not that hard if you understand the basics. Goats, like other livestock, require five essential nutrients: water, energy, protein, minerals and vitamins.

\n

Water is the most essential of these nutrients. Goats can go days with inadequate protein or not enough minerals in their diet, but they can’t survive without water. Since the requirement for water is influenced by physiologic activity such as pregnancy, lactation and growth, the best approach is to provide goats with free-choice access to fresh clean water. Make sure all goats can reach the water source and keep it clean and filled.

\n

The energy portion of the diet is the same as the calorie content of the diet. Simply stated, if you feed your goat too much energy or too many calories, they get fat, not enough calories and they get thin. Goats get energy from the feeds they eat. Speaking of feed, goats will eat between 3 – 5% of their body weight in dry feed per day. For a 40 pound goat, that is a feed intake of 1.2 pounds to 2 pounds per goat per day. The higher feed intakes are seen in lactating goats and young, growing goats. Pasture grass, plant leaves, grass and alfalfa long-stemmed forage or pellets, and grain are great sources of calories for goats. Since goats are anatomically designed to digest fiber, forages such as pasture, leaves and long-stemmed forage or pellets are always the best starting point for feeding goats. If you have goats with higher energy requirements, such as lactating does and growing goats, grain can be fed to help them satisfy energy needs. Care should be used when selecting and feeding grain since the wrong grain or too much grain can cause serious problems. It is always best to select a grain product specific for goats and to follow feeding directions on the packaging.

\n

The protein requirements of any goat vary according to the physiologic function of the goat. If the goat is pregnant, lactating or growing, the protein requirements will be higher than for a mature goat at maintenance. High protein ingredients such as fresh, pelleted or long-stemmed alfalfa, or grains such as soybean meal are high in protein and typically fed to goats with higher protein requirements. Grass pasture, long-stemmed grass forage or pellets are fed to goats with lower protein needs.

\n

Goats require a host of minerals to stay healthy. Of primary importance are salt (sodium and chloride), calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, selenium, copper and zinc. An easy way to ensure goats are getting the proper amount of minerals is to provide a free-choice, granular mineral source. The granular mineral should consist of 50% trace mineral salt (enriched with magnesium, selenium, copper and zinc) and 50% dicalcium phosphate. These ingredients are available at most feed stores and they provide a simple means of ensuring goats get adequate mineral intake.

\n

The vitamins most likely to require supplementation into goat diets are vitamin A and vitamin D. All of the B-vitamins, vitamin C and vitamin K are synthesized in the body and, therefore, they are not generally considered dietary essential. If goats have access to fresh green forage or browse, the vitamin A requirement is often satisfied. It is only goats that are eating dry, weather-damaged hay (that is not properly covered or stored) that require supplemental vitamin A. The vitamin D requirements of goats are satisfied if goats have access to sunlight, since vitamin D is synthesized by the sun on the skin surface. If goats are confined in barns, without sunlight, vitamin D supplementation would be necessary.

\n

So, there you have it. Start by providing your goat with unlimited fresh, clean water. Build the diet around high-quality fiber, such as pasture grass and long-stemmed alfalfa forage or pellets. This will provide most of the calories and protein required in the diet. Remember if you are feeding too much, the goat will become fat and if you are not feeding enough, the goat will become thin. Provide a small amount of grain, according to manufacturer’s guidelines, for lactating, and growing goats. A granular mineral mix consisting of trace mineral salt and dicalcium phosphate will supply the necessary minerals for most goats when offered free-choice. As far as vitamins, vitamin A and D are the most likely to be deficient, but not for goats that get fresh, green forage and access to sunlight.

\n

If you have questions, please contact the nutritionists at Standlee Premium Western Forage, or consult with your veterinarian.

\n
\n

\n\tBy Dr. Stephen Duren\n\t
Standlee Nutritional Experts - Performance Horse Nutrition\n

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Have you heard? Standlee Premium Western Forage’s revitalized packaging has never looked so good! With the same great product quality and consistency you’ve come to expect, we’ve freshened up the look of our packaging and website to ease your forage shopping experience.

\n

A NEW, EASY WAY TO HELP IDENTIFY THE FORAGE TYPE OR VARIETY

\n

Did you know that Standlee grows seven different varieties of quality forage (including mixed forages), in addition to our beet pulp products for you to choose from?

\n
\n\t
\n\t\t

Straight

\n\t\t
    \n\t\t\t
  • Alfalfa
  • \n\t\t\t
  • Teff Grass
  • \n\t\t\t
  • Orchard Grass
  • \n\t\t\t
  • Timothy Grass
  • \n\t\t
\n\t
\n\t
\n\t\t

Mixes

\n\t\t
    \n\t\t\t
  • Alfalfa/Oat Grass
  • \n\t\t\t
  • Alfalfa/Timothy Grass
  • \n\t\t\t
  • Alfalfa/Orchard Grass
  • \n\t\t\t
  • Beet Pulp
  • \n\t\t
\n\t
\n
\n

Standlee Premium Western Forage is all about making your experience the best possible. We are adding new icons to our packaging to represent the main forage or variety type for that particular product. This will help the you quickly identify the forage or variety type associated with that icon, spending less time in the store and more time at home with your animal.

\n\"Standlee\n

Did you know that Standlee offers six different formats of quality forage?

\n\n\"Standlee\n

A NEW, EASY WAY TO HELP IDENTIFY THE RECOMMENDED ANIMAL

\n

Did you know that Standlee Forage products are ideal for several different livestock and animal feed programs?

\n\t\t\n

Standlee Premium Western Forage is all about making your experience the best experience. We are adding new species silhouette icons to our packaging to represent the recommended animal (as recommended by our PhD nutritionists) that would benefit from this particular forage product. Since every animal has different needs for their nutrition, Standlee Forage has made it as simple as possible by providing icons to make your selection of the right forage easier.

\n\"Standlee\n

A NEW, EASY WAY TO HELP IDENTIFY THE DATE OF MANUFACTURE

\n

Standlee Premium Western Forage products are non-perishable. With that being said, as long as the products are stored in a cool, dry, well-ventilated environment out of the effects of the weather, there is really no expiration date. The date on the bales and bags is the manufacture date, which reads in the following order: day, month, year.

\n\"Standlee\n

You can expect to see updated packaging in the next few months.

\n

Contact Standlee’s Customer Service team for assistance or questions you have on any on the products we offer at 1-800-398-0819 or email customerservice@standleeforage.com.

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