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Bleeding Blue and Gold – Meet the Faces of FFA

Bleeding Blue and Gold – Meet the Faces of FFA

Supporting FFA is a big deal to us and we hope you’ll join us in celebrating National FFA Week! We’d like to introduce you to a few FFA Alumni members and share their life changing experiences from their involvement in this phenomenal organization.


Meet Jacee – Idaho FFA:

Jacee Lancaster was a member and Chapter Officer of Hagerman FFA in Idaho. She also served as a District Officer for the North Magic Valley District and is a State and American Degree recipient.

Jacee Lancaster

Why were you involved in FFA?

I grew up around agriculture and it was my way to share my passion with others as well as get further involved in the industry. FFA is more than the livestock and farming portion, but gives real world experience for any career choice, some CDE’s like these include public and extemporaneous speaking, floral design, parliamentary procedure and more.

What was your Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE)? What made you choose that project?

I had a multiple component SAE. Working for a performance horse trainer and learning how to better my horses, and myself, was part of it, as well as raising my own herd of commercial cattle, showing market and breeding sheep, and completing agronomical plant trials in rhizotrons.

What does wearing the blue corduroy jacket mean to you?

I wore my blue jacket for the final time at the 2018 National FFA convention while receiving my American degree. Hanging it up for the final time was extremely challenging. That part of my life was over, but my experience in the blue jacket was second to none. I had the opportunity to meet some incredible people, travel to places I otherwise wouldn’t have, and not only share my story, but converse with others about their fears and feelings of agriculture. The biggest thing the blue jacket did for me was help me find my voice and be willing to share my story and knowledge about the industry.

What phrase of the FFA Creed stands out the most and what does it mean to you?

While the whole creed has incredible importance and it is hard to pick one part, the second sentence, “I believe that to live and work on a good farm, or to be engaged in other agricultural pursuits, is pleasant as well as challenging; for I know the joys and discomforts of agricultural life and hold an inborn fondness for those associations which, even in hours of discouragement, I cannot deny.” This has always stood out to me because it’s wonderful to see a successful calf crop or corn crop, have a healthy herd and be able to exhibit these animals or send them into production, but I’ve also seen the side of loss of incredible animals, illness, a crop that didn’t produce well or your favorite brood animal that didn’t produce a good offspring. These experiences make it challenging to continue in this industry, but you carry on and hope for better in the next season.

Meet Brenda – Iowa FFA:

Brenda Sellers (Meyers) was a member and Chapter Officer of North Fayette FFA in Iowa.

Brenda Sellers

Why were you involved in FFA?

I was very active in 4-H growing up and was raised on a farm. FFA has so many leadership opportunities and I loved learning more about different sectors of agriculture.

What was your SAE? What made you choose that project?

Raising rabbits, I had a big passion for rabbits and learned how to expand my business.

What does wearing the blue corduroy jacket mean to you?

It was always an honor to wear my blue jacket since I was so proud to be a part of an amazing organization promoting agriculture.

What phrase of the FFA Creed stands out the most and what does it mean to you?

“I believe that to live and work on a good farm, or to be engaged in other agricultural pursuits, is pleasant as well as challenging” — this part means so much to me since my family has always depended on agriculture. I have so much respect for farmers that gives their life to feeding the world!

Meet Jasmyn – Nevada FFA:

Jasmyn Rogge (Jones) was a member and Chapter Officer of Ruby Mountain FFA in Nevada. She also served as a District Officer for the Northern Zone and as Nevada State Treasurer.

Jasmyn Rogge

Why were you involved in FFA?

It gave me self-confidence and a passion. I was never good at sports. Until, FFA I never really found an activity that kept my interest and could excel in. I loved being in the greenhouse, participating in floriculture and public speaking events.

What was your SAE? What made you choose that project?

Greenhouse Management. I loved being in the greenhouse. We would grow poinsettias for one of our major fundraisers. I loved that I could watch and care for them from their seedlings. I also loved selling all the plants we grew in the spring. Our ag teacher really let us take control and it felt great to see all our hard work come together.

What does wearing the blue corduroy jacket mean to you?

It was something I always took a lot of pride in. I was always striving for the next pin I could put on my jacket and to be able to unzip my jacket and having all the pins from the previous year/ event. Something that we always laughed about in high school was when adults would come up to us while we were in official dress and tell us how great of an organization the FFA has always been and that they love seeing kids still wearing blue jackets. I can say now I totally get it; the skills I gained in the FFA are what set me up above the rest in the job field.

What phrase of the FFA Creed stands out the most and what does it mean to you?

“For I know the joys and discomforts of Agriculture.” At the time my family would giggle when I rehearsed the creed because I didn’t come from a farming/ranching background. I grew up in town, but that’s the great thing about FFA, it’s so much more than cows and crops.

Meet Liz – Washington FFA:

Liz Wilder (Bumstead) was a member and Chapter Officer of Pullman FFA in Washington. She also served as a District Officer for District 6 and as Washington State Sentinel. (Photo Credit – Washington FFA Association)

Liz Wilder

Why were you involved in FFA?

I was involved in FFA because of the leadership opportunities and new experiences that pushed me out of my comfort zone.

What was your SAE? What made you choose that project?

My SAE was a diversified livestock experience. I raised and showed market lambs and swine which I then took across the PNW for various shows and jackpots. My SAE project was a carryover from my many years in 4-H. I started showing lambs in 4th grade as a 4-H project and never gave it up. I chose to continue it in FFA as my SAE project because I loved the challenge it provided, and then I later added market swine in the mix for further experience. I was the 2013 District 6 Star Farmer for my projects.

What does wearing the blue corduroy jacket mean to you?

For me, wearing the blue corduroy jacket means I am a part of a community of people who believe and share the same values and passions as I do. It means being a part of something bigger than myself.

What phrase of the FFA Creed stands out the most and what does it mean to you?

"I believe in my own ability to work efficiently and think clearly." To me, this phrase is the most important because it reinforces that I, as are the other thousands of FFA member, are capable of accomplishing anything we set our minds to because of the skills we gained in this organization.


Are you an FFA Alumni member, or have kids, maybe even grandkids involved? Consider supporting FFA with our “Kissing for A Cause” campaign. Vote for which farm animal you would want to kiss and Standlee donates to FFA! Also, check out some different ways to contribute to this invaluable organization. FFA is more than just agriculture (albeit important), but nurtures necessary life skills that youth need to be successful and well-rounded in the future.

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